November 30, 2010

Phrasal verb: break (something) down

"break (something) down"

Meaning: divide into smaller parts

Example: Paolo broke the car detailing project down into five main tasks.


Last week's phrasal verbs
pay for (something)
sleep over
take (something) out

Idiom: be on the go

"be on the go"

Meaning: be very busy (going from one thing or project to another)

Example: Cathy doesn't seem to get tired. She's been on the go all day.


Last week's idioms
pull an all-nighter
run down
(Someone's) made his/her own bed; now let him/her lie in it.
tight-fisted
used to

November 29, 2010

Phrasal verb: work out

"work out"

Meaning: be successful

Example: His jeweling technique really worked out fine when he detailed the paint of the Honda CR-Z.


Last week's phrasal verbs
pay for (something)
sleep over
take (something) out

Idiom: wishy-washy

"wishy-washy"

Meaning: uncommitted; without an opinion of one's own

Example: Tell her how you really feel. Don't be so wishy-washy about it.


Last week's idioms
pull an all-nighter
run down
(Someone's) made his/her own bed; now let him/her lie in it.
tight-fisted
used to

November 28, 2010

6 Tips for Presenting and Justifying an Opinion in IELTS Writing

Today's set of tips would dwell on IELTS writing task 2, particularly with regard to those questions that require you to present and justify an opinion.

1. Identify what your own opinion is. An outline could help you organize your thoughts.

2. Always provide examples to support your opinion.

3. Make use of various paragraphs to separate your points and ideas.

4. Spend more time in task 2 than in task 1.

5. When writing your introduction, never use the words and phrases you see in the question. Always paraphrase.

6. Note the word count. Your essay should have at least 250 words.

Next week, you'll receive some tips when you have to compare and contrast opinions, evidence, and implications in the IELTS Writing Module.

Cheers. :)

Other IELTS writing tips:

November 26, 2010

Idiom: used to

"used to (+ V)"

Meaning: an action that was true in the past but is not true now

Example: Jimmy used to bring his car to detailing shops. He now details it himself.


Last week's idioms:
have (one's) hands full
in the red
live and let live
nuke
over (one's) head

November 25, 2010

Phrasal verb: take (something) out

"take (something) out"

Meaning: remove from a place or thing

Example: Can you please help me take these boxes out to the garage?


Last week's phrasal verbs:
hang on
look forward to (something)

Idiom: tight-fisted

"tight-fisted"

Meaning: very frugal; unwilling to spend money unnecessarily

Example: I'm not going to be surprised if Harry declines to foot the bill. He's been known to be tight-fisted.


Last week's idioms:
have (one's) hands full
in the red
live and let live
nuke
over (one's) head

November 24, 2010

Phrasal verb: sleep over

"sleep over"

Meaning: stay somewhere for the night (informal)

Example: Michael's too drunk to drive. I guess your group just has to sleep over tonight.


Last week's phrasal verbs:
hang on
look forward to (something)

Idiom: (Someone's) made his/her own bed; now let him/her lie in it

(Someone's) made his/her own bed; now let him/her lie in it.

Meaning: Someone has caused his/her own problems; he/she will have to solve them himself/herself.

Example: Cherry really hurt the feelings of the crowd after she spoke on stage. She now has to deal with some negative publicity. She's made her own bed; now let her lie in it.


Last week's idioms:
have (one's) hands full
in the red
live and let live
nuke
over (one's) head

November 23, 2010

Idiom: run-down

"run-down"

Meaning: not well; weak; fatigued

Example: Is Nina getting enough sleep? She looks run-down.


Last week's idioms:
have (one's) hands full
in the red
live and let live
nuke
over (one's) head

November 22, 2010

Phrasal verb: pay for (something)

"pay for (something)

Meaning: be punished for doing something bad

Example: That thief will pay for stealing our coffee maker.


Last week's phrasal verbs:
hang on
look forward to (something)

Idiom: pull an all-nighter

"pull an all-nighter"

Meaning: study or work all night without getting any sleep

Example: I pulled an all-nighter at work. I'll just be resting whole day today.


Last week's idioms:
have (one's) hands full
in the red
live and let live
nuke
over (one's) head

November 21, 2010

7 Tips for Describing a Process or Object in IELTS Writing

Hello. When you're confronted with a question where you're asked to describe a process or object in IELTS writing task 1, remember the following:

1. To describe an object, mind its appearance, its main parts, and how it works. Avoid concentrating on the minor details.

2. If you find that making comparisons with other things would aid you in describing, then you could include them.

3. To describe a process, analyze the diagram so you'd be able to comprehend each stage of the process.

4. Time words and phrases help when you mention each stage. Use them to your advantage.

5. Likewise, use the passive, and present and past participle clauses in the descriptions.

6. In all cases, it is recommended that you organize your thoughts via an outline, or any technique you're familiar with, before you start writing.

7. Finally, always check if all the essential information from the picture or diagram is in your description.

Next week, we'll be starting to share some things that you should keep in mind when it comes to IELTS writing task 2.

Cheers. :)

Other IELTS writing tips:

November 19, 2010

Idiom: over (one's) head

"over one's head"

Meaning: too difficult or complicated for someone to understand

Example: His paint polishing process is way over my head. I wish he could demonstrate it again to us.


Last week's idioms:
be in and out
chicken
drop (someone) a line
for ages
get a move on

November 18, 2010

Idiom: nuke

"nuke"

Meaning: heat in a microwave

Example: Just nuke it if you feel like having hot choco.


Last week's idioms:
be in and out
chicken
drop (someone) a line
for ages
get a move on

November 17, 2010

Phrasal verb: look forward to (something)

"look forward to (something)"

Meaning: be excited about the future

Example: I'm looking forward to the opening of the new shopping mall in Pasig City.


Last week's phrasal verbs:
break down
call (someone) up
drop back
fill (something) in/out
get back

Idiom: live and let live

"live and let live"

Meaning: don't unnecessarily make things difficult; do as you wish and let others do as they wish

Example: Don't judge Nina for standing up for her team. Sometimes, you have to live and let live.


Last week's idioms:
be in and out
chicken
drop (someone) a line
for ages
get a move on

November 16, 2010

Idiom: in the red

"in the red"

Meaning: unprofitable; showing a financial loss

Example: To avoid being in the red, business owners should be vigilant with regard to unnecessary expenses.


Last week's idioms:
be in and out
chicken
drop (someone) a line
for ages
get a move on

November 15, 2010

Phrasal verb: hang on

"hang on"

Meaning: wait a short time (informal)

Example: Hang on while I lock the doors and windows.


Last week's phrasal verbs:
break down
call (someone) up
drop back
fill (something) in/out
get back

Idiom: have (one's) hands full

"have (one's) hands full"

Meaning: be extremely busy

Example: I might not be able to arrive there today. I'll have my hands full trying to finish the exterior detail of the Honda CR-V.


Last week's idioms:
be in and out
chicken
drop (someone) a line
for ages
get a move on

November 14, 2010

6 Tips for Comparing Data in IELTS Writing

Hello. It's time for another set of tips for you to improve your skills in IELTS writing task 1. We're now going to share you some tips when you compare data. Comparing data is one of the techniques that you should use to obtain high marks in IELTS writing. Here are the tips:

1. Carefully examine the data before you start writing.

2. You'd usually find that the instructions would ask you to "report on main features" and "make comparisons where relevant." With this in mind, you consequently have to select the most evident similarities and differences within the presented data.

3. It would help if you jot the features and comparisons down, and determine the sequence with which you're going to express them.

4. When you compare data, you should recognize similarities and differences. Find that part of the data that shows the main similarities and differences. It thus helps to use adverbs as well as connective words and phrases that have these effects.

5. State at all times the actual data (numbers, percentages, dates, etc.) when you make your comparison. However, be certain of its relevance to the point you are making.

6. Keep in mind that you are not expected to write down all the data you are given. State only related data that backs up your point.

Next week, you'll be learning some tips to describe a process or object.

Cheers. :)

Other IELTS writing tips:

November 12, 2010

Phrasal verb: get back

"get back"

Meaning: return

Example: I just got back from the mall. I bought some clothes.


Last week's phrasal verbs:
take (something) off
work out

Idiom: get a move on

"get a move on"

Meaning: hurry

Example: I'd like you to be early at work, so you'd better get a move on.


Last week's idioms:
There, there.
upside down
What's up?
yummy
at the eleventh hour

November 11, 2010

Phrasal verb: fill (something) in/out

"fill (something) in/out"

Meaning: to write information in blanks

Example: Kindly fill in/out the form with your name, address, email address and mobile phone number.


Last week's phrasal verbs:
take (something) off
work out

Idiom: for ages

"for ages"

Meaning: for a very long time

Example: Does Margie still live in Makati City? I haven't seen her for ages. I might pay her a visit one of these days.


Last week's idioms:
There, there.
upside down
What's up?
yummy
at the eleventh hour

November 10, 2010

Phrasal verb: drop back

"drop back"

Meaning move back in a position/group

Example: Felipe Massa's Ferrari dropped back to tenth place after a costly mistake at the third corner.


Last week's phrasal verbs:
take (something) off
work out

Idiom: drop (someone) a line

"drop someone a line"

Meaning: write to someone

Example: I think I'd have to drop a line to Sophia today. It's been some time since we have written to each other.


Last week's idioms:
There, there.
upside down
What's up?
yummy
at the eleventh hour

November 9, 2010

Phrasal verb: call (someone) up

"call (someone) up"

Meaning: phone

Example: Ask for her phone number and call her up tomorrow after your date.


Last week's phrasal verbs:
take (something) off
work out

Idiom: chicken

chicken (adjective or noun)

Meaning: cowardly

Example: Mateo won't ride that roller coaster. He's chicken / a chicken.


Last week's idioms:
There, there.
upside down
What's up?
yummy
at the eleventh hour

November 8, 2010

Phrasal verb: break down

"break down"

Meaning: get upset

Example: That guy really broke down when he found out he had left his phone at the office.


Last week's phrasal verbs:
take (something) off
work out

Idiom: be in and out

"be in and out"

Meaning: be at and away from a place during a particular time

Example: I think you better call him first before you go to his office. He could be in and out of the office for his deliveries.


Last week's idioms:
There, there.
upside down
What's up?
yummy
at the eleventh hour

November 7, 2010

6 Tips for Organizing and Selecting Data in IELTS Writing

Hello. Last week, some tips were posted to guide you with understanding and interpreting data in task 1 of IELTS writing.

To further develop your skills for IELTS writing task 1, you must organize and select your data. In other words, you have to:

1. Study the data before you begin to write.

2. Identify and focus on the most important aspects of the data.

3. Discover either the most noteworthy changes over time or the fundamental points of comparison between the given categories.

4. Formulate your description of the data around the said fundamental points, and include any pertinent subordinate points.

5. Make use of synonyms. It's always recommended that you don't quote the words used in the task and the data.

6. Also, take advantage of linking words to properly connect not only the ideas, but also the flow of ideas in your essay.

Next week, you'll be learning how to compare data - another important skill you have to manifest to make it good in IELTS writing task 1.

Cheers. :)

Other IELTS writing tips:

November 5, 2010

Idiom: at the eleventh hour

"at the eleventh hour"

Meaning: at the last minute; almost too late

Example: Their auto detailing project was finished at the eleventh hour, just in time for the transport show.


Last week's idioms:
keep/stay in touch (with someone)
live from hand to mouth
pretty (adv.)
rub (someone) the wrong way
a snap

November 2, 2010

Idiom: upside down

"upside down"

Meaning: with the bottom part on top and the top part on bottom

Example: Stack the containers upside down so they won't collect water just in case it rains.


Last week's idioms:
keep/stay in touch (with someone)
live from hand to mouth
pretty (adv.)
rub (someone) the wrong way
a snap

November 1, 2010